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-   -   2002 Corolla Burning Too Much Oil? (http://www.corollaforum.com/showthread.php?t=1017)

bdzimmermann 05-02-2013 12:16 PM

2002 Corolla Burning Too Much Oil?
 
'Just bought an '02 Corolla with 76K miles about a month ago. Have noticed the car burns about 1.5 qts of oil within the first 1,200 miles. Is this normal for this vintage car? No leaks or smoke from the exhaust. Car runs fine otherwise. Should I consider going to a heavier oil (5W-30)? Any other suggestions?

Gonzalgi21 05-07-2013 07:35 PM

Use 10w-30 oil, its not normal for it to burn that much oil but then again if you arent the original owner you cant blame yourself you can only deal with it. With the thicker oil it will still burn but at a slower rate.

Scott O'Kashan 05-07-2013 08:31 PM

A 10W-30 viscosity is no thicker or thinner than a 5W-30 viscosity. They are both SAE 30 oils at hot engine temperatures. A 5W-30 has the oil flowing faster to engine parts that need lubricating than a 10W-30 can.

There are many causes for increased oil consumption, (including the possibility of oil leaks), that should be investigated.

Gonzalgi21 05-08-2013 12:15 AM

Finding the cause of oil consumption isnt going to help the OP because it is irreversible, the only solution is to rebuild the whole engine. He is asking for a way to help it consume less. I correct myself i actually meant use 10w-40 which is thicker and therefore harder to burn through, just as an example drink a cup of water (5w-30) then drink a cup of honey (10w-40) you will see that the cup of honey takes much longer and is tougher to drink due to its thickness. While using this thicker oil make sure to warm the car up when cold since it does take longer for it to circulate throughout your engine.

bdzimmermann 05-08-2013 08:00 AM

I'm currently monitoring oil consumption more accurately to get a better baseline for the 10W-30 oil. I noticed that the manufacturer does recommend 5W-30, so I was going to try that at my next oil change (although, from what I read, the 5W-30 kinematic properties aren't much different than those of the 10W-30 oils when the engine is warm). Personally, if the 1.5 qt/1200 miles holds, im OK with that as long as it doesn't get worse over time. My '96 850 Volvo (350+K miles) has been burning oil for a few years now, and all it takes is a quick check of the dipstick every time I gas up. 'Any other thoughts/suggestions?

Gonzalgi21 05-08-2013 12:26 PM

The manufacturer does recommend 5w-30 but remember that it was the car is new which means the engine is not consuming oil. When the engine starts consuming oil the use of 5w-30 goes out the window. At operating temperature 10w-30 and 5w-30 are the same thing so id stay away from both of those and i wouldnt use additives either.

Scott O'Kashan 05-08-2013 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gonzalgi21 (Post 3662)
Finding the cause of oil consumption isnt going to help the OP because it is irreversible, the only solution is to rebuild the whole engine. He is asking for a way to help it consume less. I correct myself i actually meant use 10w-40 which is thicker and therefore harder to burn through, just as an example drink a cup of water (5w-30) then drink a cup of honey (10w-40) you will see that the cup of honey takes much longer and is tougher to drink due to its thickness. While using this thicker oil make sure to warm the car up when cold since it does take longer for it to circulate throughout your engine.

The 2002 Toyota Corolla has a well earned reputation for consuming oil and out of all model years of Corolla's, the 2002 year was the worst one for this problem -

http://www.carcomplaints.com/Toyota/Corolla/

Finding the cause of the oil consumption most certainly will help and is many times reversible.

There are many potential causes of higher than normal oil consumption. Below I shall list a few -

1. Plugged PCV valve/system, increasing pressures inside the crankcase, which can force oil into the PCV system, where it is then sucked into the combustion chambers and burned.

2. The use of petroleum oils can many times cause sludge, carbon and varnish deposits inside the engine, which can cause the piston rings to become gummed-up, stick and not function properly, allowing excessive amounts of oil to get by the rings, up into the combustion chamber and be burned.

3. Petroleum oils have a much higher volatility rate, (burn off easier), than a top performing PAO synthetic oil does and lower performing petroleum oils can burn off/evaporate at a much higher rate than even a better quality petroloem oil will.

4. Higher mileage engines can tend to develop oil leaks, especially when using petroleum oils as this practice allows the engine to run hotter which dries out and cracks all manner of different gaskets with resulting oil leaks.

Using a thicker viscosity than what the engineers who designed the engine recommend will only serve to exacerbate all the above issues and will also reduce fuel economy, increase emissions, increase wear rates, reduce power/throttle response and can cause the engine to run even hotter as the thicker oil flows at a slower rate and doesn't transfer heat as well.

Scott O'Kashan 05-08-2013 06:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bdzimmermann (Post 3663)
I'm currently monitoring oil consumption more accurately to get a better baseline for the 10W-30 oil. I noticed that the manufacturer does recommend 5W-30, so I was going to try that at my next oil change (although, from what I read, the 5W-30 kinematic properties aren't much different than those of the 10W-30 oils when the engine is warm). Personally, if the 1.5 qt/1200 miles holds, im OK with that as long as it doesn't get worse over time. My '96 850 Volvo (350+K miles) has been burning oil for a few years now, and all it takes is a quick check of the dipstick every time I gas up. 'Any other thoughts/suggestions?

What type, (synthetic, semi-synthetic or petroleum), oil is being used, as well as which brand?

Do you have service records with this vehicle that show the oil change intervals?

Have oil leaks been ruled out yet as the cause of this problem?

Has the PCV valve been diagnosed as functioning properly and not gummed-up with petroleum oil sludge?

I suggest removing the oil fill cap and with a bright light look inside the engine and see if there is evidence of sludge and varnish left behind by petroleum oils inside the engine. This is common and can cause many problems.

Is there any black, oily residue inside the tailpipe, or do you notice any blue smoke coming out the tailpipe, particularly at engine start up?

bdzimmermann 05-10-2013 08:10 AM

Scott - what is a "plugged PCV valve"? I had a similar problem with my old 850 Volvo, where all that was needed was a new "flame trap" to prevent pressure from building up in the engine. Is this something I can check/repair myself?

P.S.: I use either Pennzoil or Castrol - not sure if they're pteroleum-based.

Thanks,

Bernie

Gonzalgi21 05-13-2013 01:16 AM

Remove the pcv valve and check it out.


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