Go Back   Toyota Corolla Forum > Corolla Forums > 2009 - 2013 Toyota Corolla

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-13-2012, 04:21 PM   #11
rjreynolds
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 6
Default oil specs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted View Post
So the change in specifications was not due to engineering but to bureaucracy,
Yes, in some instances, specs were changed do to government mandates only and not engineering. I am currently using 5w-30 but will switch to 0w-30 in the winter or possibly at next oil change.

Last edited by rjreynolds; 06-14-2012 at 10:52 PM.
rjreynolds is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Corolla Forum

Join Corolla Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you a Toyota Corolla fan? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's a great place for Toyota Corolla and Matrix Fans to meet online.
Once you join you'll be able to post messages, upload pictures of your Toyota, and have a great time with other Corolla fans. Whether your an old timer or just bought your Toyota you'll find that Corolla Forum is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join CorollaForum.com Today! - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Old 06-15-2012, 01:21 AM   #12
corolla_mike
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Somewhere in the United States
Posts: 96
Default

Wonder if the engine troubles from 2003+ were a result of Toyota's attempts to increase CAFE performance with the 0-weight oils? One of the culprits was the oil return holes in the pistons being too small/poorly machined, causing oil to back up in the cylinder heads and congeal (or something like that). Leave it to government to screw up the works.
corolla_mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 03:56 PM   #13
lswindell4
OBXNX
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Eastern, NC
Posts: 9
Default

I asked our local toyota master mechanic (a really good guy) about the oil change interval. Specifically, I asked him would it be better if I changed the oil at 5,000 miles for the break-in oil on my 2012 Corolla S instead of 10,000. He had just returned from the master toyota mechanic course in which this was discussed and he told me that I should stick with the 10,000 mile intervals due to potential "teflon build-up" if you change the synthetic oil too often. Not sure if I follow that. Does the teflon go away as the oil changes? Good research topic.
lswindell4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 04:41 PM   #14
Forever Corolla
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In Florida
Posts: 25
Default

Iswindell 4,

Synthetics are GREAT, but your rings need to seat properly.
It takes a while for them to seat (wear) so that they seal properly.
I still believe in changing oil often, but the synthetics are actually a lot better than regular oil. This is an expert question, but again, my mindset is to buy the best protection and then change it sooner than later....
Forever Corolla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 04:45 PM   #15
Scout706
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 80
Default

I'm just guessing - the teflon is in the initial oil from the factory.

Second guess - he was spoofing you. It's been a long hard process to get teflon and motor oil to work together .
Scout706 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 08:36 PM   #16
lswindell4
OBXNX
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Eastern, NC
Posts: 9
Default Break-in oil

I feel that he may have been spoofing me too. I have ALWAYS changed out the "breakin" oil at an ealier interval than the normal oil change interval (as was always indicated by the owner's manuel) but my last 3 Toyota's all have called for 10,000 mile initial oil change. A primary reason I buy Toyotas, and new ones, is so I can maintain and keep a reliable auto for many years. The master technician also said that the new motors are built much better (like blueprinting a motor in the old days) and do not have the metal shavings in the breakin oil like earlier motors. Any more thoughts out there?
lswindell4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2012, 09:42 PM   #17
Forever Corolla
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In Florida
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lswindell4 View Post
I feel that he may have been spoofing me too. I have ALWAYS changed out the "breakin" oil at an ealier interval than the normal oil change interval (as was always indicated by the owner's manuel) but my last 3 Toyota's all have called for 10,000 mile initial oil change. A primary reason I buy Toyotas, and new ones, is so I can maintain and keep a reliable auto for many years. The master technician also said that the new motors are built much better (like blueprinting a motor in the old days) and do not have the metal shavings in the breakin oil like earlier motors. Any more thoughts out there?
Actually there is a lot of truth to the above information. I am not convinced that they use a break in oil anymore, but they very well may still need one.
Balancing: Pistons for each engine are much closer to the same weight when sorted and grouped as sets.
Tolerances: Engine blocks are made to tighter specs due to better machining.
Rings: have a special coating that is perhaps softer, but allows them to form and fit to the cylinder walls faster,
There are a lot of reasons this is important and must happen, but this is not the forum to get into the specifics.
Due to the lower HP requirements of our engines, there is inherently less wear and tear.
There are quite a few reasons for this, but we did not buy our Corolla's to blow away BMW's at the stop light.
We will more likely see 300,000 miles on the odometer at the actual finish line.
They can have the next light, we will have the last one in the end.
so, the big question is: How long should we wait to change the Oil? I would rather change it at its half life. But, what is it's full life?
We all want to have a reliable car for the longest possible time.
It is your decision.
New oil means less wear.
It takes a little while for engines to "Break In"
The first oil change is the most crucial.
You will get more metal particles with a brand new engine as it wears and breaks in. Your oil filter takes care of a lot of that, but I would recommend changing the filter at the first oil change..
You have to decide for yourself what is best.
I am not smarter than your engineers.
Your engineers really have an interest in you being able to make it through your warranty, but are they really honestly going to look out for your best interest?
Bottom line. If you want to get 300,000 miles out of your corolla, then this is an important issue. If you are planing on trading it before you get to 100,000 miles, it is of little importance.
If you only plan on driving it for 30,000 miles, you could just top off your oil once a year... (That is meant as a joke, do not wait a year to check your oil)

Last edited by Forever Corolla; 06-23-2012 at 11:26 AM.
Forever Corolla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2012, 12:05 PM   #18
Forever Corolla
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In Florida
Posts: 25
Cool Oil viscosity

Quote:
Originally Posted by corolla_mike View Post
The 0W oils, as I've come to understand them, are specified for the purpose of raising CAFE standards. The thinner the oil, the easier the engine spins, thereby increasing MPGs.

As we all know, the sturdier the oil, the less the engine will wear.

For the sake of your warranty, do what the mechanical engi... er, uh, socio-political engineers say to do. After that, go with your gut.
The 0 viscosity allows the cold engine to turn over better when it is very cold outside compared to a straight 30 viscosity.
It also allows the oil to circulate and to coat the cylinder walls better until the engine begins to warm up.

Oil viscosity is a science in and of itself.
Think about this for a few.
A straight 30 viscosity will pour out of the can visually like a 30 viscosity at room temperature.
A straight 30 viscosity may very well pour like a 100 weight (Honey) at zero degrees F, when compared to the visual we saw at room temperature.
A straight 30 viscosity may pour like water at 200 degrees F when compared to our visual pouring at room temperature.

A Multi-Viscosity will have a more consistent pour rate at different temperatures. You could say the oil will be more stable.

A Multi Viscosity 0-30 oil may also visually pour like a 30 viscosity at room temperature.
It may look like it pours the same at zero degrees F. (it pours like a straight 0 viscosity oil would if it were now at zero degrees F)
It may visually look like it pours the same at 200 Degrees F. (if you heated a 100 viscosity room temperature oil up to 200 degrees, it would now pour like a 30 viscosity did at room temperature)

In other words, the wider the range, the more stable the visual pour at various temperatures.

It is my understanding that you should not mix different multi-viscosity synthetic oils, because the polymer chains are designed differently for each multi-viscosity product (Synthetics each have very specific polymer chains for each range). Also, in a perfect world, you should not mix different brands of synthetics, because they will use different polymer chains, That is why AMSOIL is Different than Mobil One, They are not the same product.
There really is a difference, the performance between the two will be measurable. We have a lot of decisions. Price, Performance, Convenience. We all have different needs.

This being said, in the long run, you may never see, feel or know the difference. You need oil. Oil needs to flow. Oil needs to coat. Oil needs to flow through the filter. Oil can wear out (Time, Dilution, Blow-by, Moisture and Shear).

The statements above are not based on actual viscosity figures, but instead are just used to illustrate a visual of the reasons for Multi-viscosity.
If you do not follow the points made above, it really is not important. Just follow the Manufactures recommendations.

If you feel 30 will offer your Corolla better protection than a 20 viscosity, it is your Corolla. I will slowly make up my mind as I monitor the break in. Perhaps I may decide on a 0w-30..

Again, the visual Viscosity ratings I applied above are made up.
They do not in any way match up to the actual Industry rating system at the temperatures mentioned above.

Just wanted to give my thoughts; to stress what might not be obvious, that the wider the range of the viscosity, the more stable the pouring rate of oil is at the different operating temperatures.

Did I confuse anyone? Did I confuse everyone?

Visual: Straight 30 at room temperature, Normal
Visual: Straight 100 at room temperature, Honey
Visual: Straight 0 at room temperature, Water

Side Note: the "w" in the spec means Winter.
Some people refer to the W as weight.
The W does not mean weight.
Viscosity has nothing to do with Weight.
It would be wrong to refer to a straight 30 viscosity as 30 weight.

I know that no one here would make that mistake, but it might be useful information for someone... So I included it for free...
Might even add value to my 2 cents worth...

Last edited by Forever Corolla; 06-23-2012 at 11:54 PM.
Forever Corolla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2012, 01:17 PM   #19
Ted
Member
 
Ted's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 39
Default

That was a very informative post but I do have one question. Tomorrow the temperature forecast for where I live is 102 and 103 on Monday. And, we're not even in the hot part of Summer yet. Wouldn't I be better off with 0W-30 oil instead of 0W-20?
__________________
2012 Corolla S
2006 Tundra
Ted is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2012, 03:38 PM   #20
Forever Corolla
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: In Florida
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted View Post
That was a very informative post but I do have one question. Tomorrow the temperature forecast for where I live is 102 and 103 on Monday. And, we're not even in the hot part of Summer yet. Wouldn't I be better off with 0W-30 oil instead of 0W-20?
Perhaps..

First.. Does your Corolla have a thermostat?
Does your thermostat open at a particular temperature?
Does your radiator radiate?
If you had a real temperature gauge attached, that would accurately monitor the coolant and the oil, would it register 10 degrees hotter?
In the winter, when it is 32 degrees outside would this coolant be 10 degrees colder?

So, if the coolant and the oil temp are kept at a reasonably consistent operating temperature, do you need a thicker oil?
Or do you need a very good synthetic oil that has a broader range of operating temperatures?

How about when you drive up a mountain? Or pull a trailer?

Your engine was designed to use a particular viscosity.
I can not answer this question.. I did not design the engine.
Do you need better protection?

We each will have to decide for ourselves.
A more important question is: Do you have a good relationship with your Creator?
I will trust in Him for my salvation.
I trust Him more than I do the Designers at Toyota.
I will probably follow their recommended specifications, but I could be converted to 0w-30.
The argument would have to be convincing. It would have to prove not only reasonable, but also wise to reject their recommendation.
Some decisions in life are important, but we all agree there are times when we can safely try something different.

As a group, perhaps we can try both and compare notes in a few years.
You may very well find we will get better gas mileage if we will just use the recommended 0w-20.
If the engineers have worked in our best interests we may even get Longer Engine life by following their recommendations, but we will never get eternal life out of our Toyota engines.

I will change my oil and filter at 5,000 miles and let Toyota Change my oil at 10,000 miles. YMMV.

I will use either the Toyota Oil Filter, or I may use AMSOIL.

Do not let me persuade you to do the same, unless you see wisdom in my decision..

I acknowledge my lack of expert knowledge and experience.
I do know there have been quite a few Corollas that have managed to make it to 300,000 miles and many have been driven right here at sea level in Florida.

It is good you are questioning the established recommendation.
Lets explore this further. Together we each have a lot of resources, knowledge and experience. The company line seems to include Teflon Build-up. I need convincing...

Last edited by Forever Corolla; 06-23-2012 at 03:45 PM.
Forever Corolla is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2010 - 2013 corollaforum.com
This site is in no way affiliated with Toyota.