2002 Corolla - Burning Too Much Oil?

Discussion in '1998 - 2002 Toyota Corolla' started by bdzimmermann, May 2, 2013.

  1. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    'Just bought an '02 Corolla with 76K miles about a month ago. Have noticed the car burns about 1.5 qts of oil within the first 1,200 miles. Is this normal for this vintage car? No leaks or smoke from the exhaust. Car runs fine otherwise. Should I consider going to a heavier oil (5W-30)? Any other suggestions?
     
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  3. Gonzalgi21

    Gonzalgi21 New Member

    Use 10w-30 oil, its not normal for it to burn that much oil but then again if you arent the original owner you cant blame yourself you can only deal with it. With the thicker oil it will still burn but at a slower rate.
     
  4. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    A 10W-30 viscosity is no thicker or thinner than a 5W-30 viscosity. They are both SAE 30 oils at hot engine temperatures. A 5W-30 has the oil flowing faster to engine parts that need lubricating than a 10W-30 can.

    There are many causes for increased oil consumption, (including the possibility of oil leaks), that should be investigated.
     
  5. Gonzalgi21

    Gonzalgi21 New Member

    Finding the cause of oil consumption isnt going to help the OP because it is irreversible, the only solution is to rebuild the whole engine. He is asking for a way to help it consume less. I correct myself i actually meant use 10w-40 which is thicker and therefore harder to burn through, just as an example drink a cup of water (5w-30) then drink a cup of honey (10w-40) you will see that the cup of honey takes much longer and is tougher to drink due to its thickness. While using this thicker oil make sure to warm the car up when cold since it does take longer for it to circulate throughout your engine.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2013
  6. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    I'm currently monitoring oil consumption more accurately to get a better baseline for the 10W-30 oil. I noticed that the manufacturer does recommend 5W-30, so I was going to try that at my next oil change (although, from what I read, the 5W-30 kinematic properties aren't much different than those of the 10W-30 oils when the engine is warm). Personally, if the 1.5 qt/1200 miles holds, im OK with that as long as it doesn't get worse over time. My '96 850 Volvo (350+K miles) has been burning oil for a few years now, and all it takes is a quick check of the dipstick every time I gas up. 'Any other thoughts/suggestions?
     
  7. Gonzalgi21

    Gonzalgi21 New Member

    The manufacturer does recommend 5w-30 but remember that it was the car is new which means the engine is not consuming oil. When the engine starts consuming oil the use of 5w-30 goes out the window. At operating temperature 10w-30 and 5w-30 are the same thing so id stay away from both of those and i wouldnt use additives either.
     
  8. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    The 2002 Toyota Corolla has a well earned reputation for consuming oil and out of all model years of Corolla's, the 2002 year was the worst one for this problem -

    http://www.carcomplaints.com/Toyota/Corolla/

    Finding the cause of the oil consumption most certainly will help and is many times reversible.

    There are many potential causes of higher than normal oil consumption. Below I shall list a few -

    1. Plugged PCV valve/system, increasing pressures inside the crankcase, which can force oil into the PCV system, where it is then sucked into the combustion chambers and burned.

    2. The use of petroleum oils can many times cause sludge, carbon and varnish deposits inside the engine, which can cause the piston rings to become gummed-up, stick and not function properly, allowing excessive amounts of oil to get by the rings, up into the combustion chamber and be burned.

    3. Petroleum oils have a much higher volatility rate, (burn off easier), than a top performing PAO synthetic oil does and lower performing petroleum oils can burn off/evaporate at a much higher rate than even a better quality petroloem oil will.

    4. Higher mileage engines can tend to develop oil leaks, especially when using petroleum oils as this practice allows the engine to run hotter which dries out and cracks all manner of different gaskets with resulting oil leaks.

    Using a thicker viscosity than what the engineers who designed the engine recommend will only serve to exacerbate all the above issues and will also reduce fuel economy, increase emissions, increase wear rates, reduce power/throttle response and can cause the engine to run even hotter as the thicker oil flows at a slower rate and doesn't transfer heat as well.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2013
  9. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    What type, (synthetic, semi-synthetic or petroleum), oil is being used, as well as which brand?

    Do you have service records with this vehicle that show the oil change intervals?

    Have oil leaks been ruled out yet as the cause of this problem?

    Has the PCV valve been diagnosed as functioning properly and not gummed-up with petroleum oil sludge?

    I suggest removing the oil fill cap and with a bright light look inside the engine and see if there is evidence of sludge and varnish left behind by petroleum oils inside the engine. This is common and can cause many problems.

    Is there any black, oily residue inside the tailpipe, or do you notice any blue smoke coming out the tailpipe, particularly at engine start up?
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2013
  10. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    Scott - what is a "plugged PCV valve"? I had a similar problem with my old 850 Volvo, where all that was needed was a new "flame trap" to prevent pressure from building up in the engine. Is this something I can check/repair myself?

    P.S.: I use either Pennzoil or Castrol - not sure if they're pteroleum-based.

    Thanks,

    Bernie
     
  11. Gonzalgi21

    Gonzalgi21 New Member

    Remove the pcv valve and check it out.
     
  12. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    PCV valve looked dirty, but still 'rattled'. Tried to get a new one from Advanced Auto, but they sold me a Purolator with wrong threads (*&#%$!!!). Called the dealer, they said they need the P/N (???), as Toyota apparently installed two different types that year. Of course, they're NOT in stock ...
     
  13. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    It the PCV valve still rattles it's functioning and there is no need or benefit in replacing it.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2013
  14. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Have you looked inside the engine with a strong light to see if there is petroleum oil sludge and varnish in the engine? Petroleum oil sludge can cause oil consumption to increase.
     
  15. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    How would petroleum oil sludge cause oil consumption to increase? How do I get rid of the petroleum oil sludge?
     
  16. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Sludge, gum and varnish build up from the use of petroleum oils can cause the piston rings to stick and not function properly, i.e. allow oil to enter the combustion chamber where it is burned and sent out with the exhaust. The cure is to change the oil using a quality engine flush to help remove the sludge, gum and varnish and then switching over to a quality/top shelf synthetic oil like AMSOIL, which can greatly reduce the incidence of sludge.

    Have you looked inside the engine for sludge yet?
     
  17. bdzimmermann

    bdzimmermann New Member

    Checked inside the engine, and did notice varnish. Where do I get a "quality engine flush"?
     
  18. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    I have a 2002 and noticed that mine has been consuming oil. DO you know where I can located this PCV valve?
     
  19. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    http://www.carcomplaints.com/Toyota/Corolla/

    The 2002 model year of Corolla's is noted for higher than average oil consumption. Some oil consumption is normal and expected. All engines consume at least some oil.

    Using a quality synthetic oil like AMSOIL will help to reduce oil consumption.
     
  20. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    I heard a lot about AMSOIL, but is it worth putting that kid of oil in her if its burning that much???

    I saw that link, some peopel had it worse than my situation.
     
  21. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Well how much oil is it consuming? Have you ever kept records for this?

    Again, AMSOIL reduces oil consumption.
     
  22. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    WELL, i AM GOI NG TO BE DRIVING THIS CAR MORE AND MORE, SO I WILL BE KEEPING RECORDS OF THIS. iT appears to me that it is about a quart every 800-1000 miles. Rough estimate though.

    Is amsoil better than lucas?

    Can you buy Amsoil anywhere?

    Where is this PCV? I would like to inspect it
     
  23. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    AMSOIL is not an oil additive. AMSOIL is the pioneering leader in the synthetic oil industry and is known as, "The First in Synthetics", (tm) and has the well earned reputation of the best oil in the world.

    You can get AMSOIL products from me. I have Product Distribution Centers all over the U.S. and Canada. PM me for a price quote.

    Here is a YouTube video showing how to replace a PVC valve on a 2004 Toyota Corolla -



    I hope this helps.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2015
  24. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    is 2004 same as a 2002 pcv location?
     
  25. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Most probably, yes. Take a look and see. :thumbsup:
     
  26. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    pm sent
     
  27. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    ICan't AccessTheVideo
     
  28. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    The video was helpful. I never noticed the guy using a grommet. Are they suppose to have one?!?!?!
     
  29. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    I went and changed the PCV valve. at first it was stuck and looked bad, but the more i shook it around, the valve became unstuck. (still bought a new one and installed it). I tightenened the valve cover

    So I will see what happens
     
  30. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

  31. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    As it turns out, every 550 miles I have to add a quart of oil....
     
  32. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    I fogure, at this rate, is it even worth changing the oil since you have to add a quart every 500 miles. I mean its 5-6 quarts every 3000 miles which is more than the capacity of oil in the engine WTH!!
     
  33. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    why has this haven't been brought up to toyota on a larger scale
     
  34. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    Ok, so even with going part synthetic and pcv valve, etc. I still consume oil.

    Here's what I will do (and chime in for asny feedback):

    1; Change the valve cover gasket (as I suspect burning oil- not a lot)
    2; Do a compression test on the cylinders ( I have the tools, just don't know how to do it)
    3; Worst case scenerio, put a cap full of brake fluid in every cylinder in hopes the rings will expand (old trick)
     
  35. Donabed Kopoian

    Donabed Kopoian 6 Speed Master

    You'll still want to change the oil to get rid of sludge at the bottom of the pan, even with burning, not to mention the filter will eventually gum up.

    To do a compression test, remove all spark plugs, then do a couple cranks ok each cylinder and write down the numbers (disconnect the ignition coil as well).

    Then add a cap full of oil to each cylinder, and repeat the test, writing those numbers down.

    If your wet test numbers are higher, then your rings are shot. If the numbers match, then valve guides are to blame.
     
  36. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    I have done some research on this issue and I have discovered that with the 1998-2002 Toyota Corolla's there is a problem with the 1.8 litre engines that causes high oil consumption. Toyota has addressed the issue with an updated piston design, but having the engine torn down to have new pistons and rings installed is a very expensive proposition.

    I was looking at a 2001 Corolla to purchase and went to http://www.CarComplaints.com searching for the 2001 Corolla and that is how I discovered this problem. When I went to test drive this car, I revved the engine to 4,000 + rpm's 4-5 times and then quickly hopped out of the car to look at what was coming out of the tailpipe, which was a large cloud of blue smoke, indicating the engine was burning a lot of oil. Of course, I didn't purchase the car. Rev the engine up and down several times with your own car and look at what is coming out the tailpipe and I think you will discover that same cloud of blue smoke, indicating oil burning.

    I have links about this issue, one of them coming right from Toyota, that I will post as soon as I can. In the meantime, Google -> 2001 Corolla, oil burning, and you will find a plethora of information on this notorious problem that 1998 - 2002 Corolla's have. I read reports of people having to add oil to these engines at the rate of 1 quart per 100 miles! It's a serious problem.

    Plan on either selling the car or having the engine rebuilt, (thousands of dollars in cost), with Toyota redesigned pistons. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.:(
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  37. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    bdzimmermann - Any updates on the oil consumption issue?

    Since you made your post I have done some research on this issue and it apparently affects all 1998-2002 Corolla 1.8 litre engines. The only fix is to have Toyota updated design pistons and rings installed. Very expensive.
     
  38. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    What numbers should I be doingwith the compression test?

    Anyone heard of the brake fluid trick?
     
  39. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Are you getting blue smoke out the tailpipe when repeatedly revving the engine?

    Brake fluid trick?
     
  40. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    I didn't notice blue smoke coming from the back

    Ok so i did th compression test starting with the cylinders facing thw belts (near them)

    1) 145 psi
    2) 87 psi
    3) 140 psi
    4) 70psi (nearest the drivers side

    The spark plugs all seemed to have a very white chaulky appearance
    I didn't add the oil yet but will

    I already suspect bad rings
     
  41. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    If you add a cap full of brake fluid to every cylinder, the rings will expand when you run it
     
  42. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    Ok so just did the wet test, same cylinder from belts to driver side:
    1) 170
    2) 130
    3) 170
    4) 130

    Going by the logic mentioned here, two of my rings seem shot. What do you guys suppose is going on here?

    where do I lie?
     
  43. Donabed Kopoian

    Donabed Kopoian 6 Speed Master

    Yeah, rings in #2 and #4 are toast. There is a defect with these engines where the piston rings will wear prematurely and cause excessive oil consumption. Either you'll have to save up for another car, or rebuilt the motor that is in it now. Both options will cost you less in the long run as opposed to continuously adding oil to the engine. Some people have it so bad that they are adding a quart every 200 miles. That gets pretty expensive.
     
  44. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    The rings don't cause the problem, the pistons combined with the use of lower performing petroleum oils do. Use the same pistons with petroleum oil and the problem will happen again.

    I sent you a private message with a possible much less costly solution than rebuilding the engine.

    Using Google, doing a keyword search -> Corolla, Burning Oil, I discovered there are many articles about this issue. Apparently the design temperature for the pistons in this engine was 120 degrees Celsius and the actual temperatures reached are 160 degrees Celsius, which causes the petroleum oil to sludge up and carbon to accumulate in the piston oil holes that allow oil to flow to the piston rings. This can cause the piston rings to stick, (allowing high rates of oil burning), and also can block those oil holes, preventing oil from getting to the piston rings and subsequently the piston rings wear very, very quickly, then allowing oil to be able to slip past the piston rings, into the combustion chamber and out the exhaust. Toyota has addressed this issue with an updated piston design with more oil holes in the piston.

    The part number for the redesigned pistons is Toyota part # 13101-22142.
     
  45. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    To detect a problem with the piston rings, either in wear or gummed up/sticking rings from using petroleum oils combined with hot engine temperatures, (which is the problem with this engine), a dry vs. wet compression test needs to be completed. The different readings between the two will tell the true story.

    It might be possible to free up those sticking oil control rings and restore the engines normal oil consumption. I sent you a private message about this. :thumbsup:
     
  46. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Are you following the correct compression test procedures?

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2015
  47. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Another valuable diagnostic test for an engine with excessive oil consumption -

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 8, 2015
  48. Donabed Kopoian

    Donabed Kopoian 6 Speed Master

    Dry test was on Page 4 Scott.
     
  49. Scott O'Kashan

    Scott O'Kashan Super Moderator

    Yes, not wet.
     
  50. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    Thanks for the helpful links.

    I did do it that way, so my dry /wet test (leakdown) was successful.

    I did assume that cylinder 1 and 3 are shot (the rings/pistons)

    I will be looking through the inbox, thanks scott!

    Also i pulled codes (engine light) and I got codes P0300 and P0303 cylinder three causing misfire.
     
  51. porschpow

    porschpow New Member

    nEVERMIND I DIDN'T DO THE LEAK DOWN, JUST COMPRESSION TEST
     

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