change cvt tranny fluid?

#1
local toyota dealer says they do not recommend a tranny fluid change. 2015 corolla now has about 86k and it shifts rough at times. i have not had any other issues at all, as it has gotten colder out i have noticed the shifting a little more.

anyone have any suggestions? i hear some people recommend the cvt tranny fluid change and others do not
 
#3
local toyota dealer says they do not recommend a tranny fluid change. 2015 corolla now has about 86k and it shifts rough at times. i have not had any other issues at all, as it has gotten colder out i have noticed the shifting a little more.

anyone have any suggestions? i hear some people recommend the cvt tranny fluid change and others do not
I have been fighting the same battle. Ten different dealer's, ten different answers (i.e. 60k, or 100K, or 120K miles). Some dealers won't even touch it at 60K miles. I emailed Toyota customer service, and they specify inspections, per the warranty and maintenance guide. They will not provide a definitive change interval. However, dealers won't tell you what that inspection entails. I'm sure they don't drain any fluid and perform an analysis. Probably just charge you $100 to check for leaks and fluid level. I'm coming up on 60K miles, but I'll wait until 100K miles to have mine replaced. It's funny, my wife's Prius has a CVT (don't know if its the same model or not) with a recommended 60K mile service. I don't understand why this is such a secret.
 
#4
Just bought a new 2019 Corolla Hatchback with CVT. I've always been a believer in regular trans fluid replacement, draining the pan every 10,000 and replacing with new fluid. I never flush. This is very hard with no dipstick. Just saw a procedure on Youtube to check trans fluid level using instrument panel method. Very complicated and very fluid temperature sensitive. Also complicated to replace fluid with inaccessible fill plug. I'm going to wait until out of warranty and start my 10,000 mile service intervals. I don't understand why if fluid level is so critical (has to be checked at specific temp ) that Toyota makes it so difficult. Also the old dealer story that transmission fluid doesn't need to be changed has been debunked. There is no such thing as permanent fluid. Don't even get me started on extended oil change intervals.
 

jolly

New Member
#6
I don't understand why if fluid level is so critical (has to be checked at specific temp ) that Toyota makes it so difficult. Also the old dealer story that transmission fluid doesn't need to be changed has been debunked
10K sounds a bit overkill even for the good old days. Can’t hurt anyway (except wallet and environment). Just don’t forget that yes, volume/temperature is crucial, as those fluids not only lubricate parts but play an active role in friction/pressure.

Indeed, there is no “lifetime fluid”. Not sure where this myth came from (I have yet to see any official manufacturer documentation saying so). Maybe from when dipsticks were replaced by closed filling holes for engineering reasons (not just on CVT).
 
#7
10K sounds a bit overkill even for the good old days. Can’t hurt anyway (except wallet and environment). Just don’t forget that yes, volume/temperature is crucial, as those fluids not only lubricate parts but play an active role in friction/pressure.

Indeed, there is no “lifetime fluid”. Not sure where this myth came from (I have yet to see any official manufacturer documentation saying so). Maybe from when dipsticks were replaced by closed filling holes for engineering reasons (not just on CVT).
Lifetime of the CVT/Trans.. if it fails at 150k miles then the fluid lasted the life time of the trans.

They dont want your car to last a million miles or you wont be buying another one for a long time

I wanted to do a fluid change at 60k but out of state family member was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.. so were driving up to Nebraska in december (from Florida) long story short, good bye money
 
#8
I have been fighting the same battle. Ten different dealer's, ten different answers (i.e. 60k, or 100K, or 120K miles). Some dealers won't even touch it at 60K miles. I emailed Toyota customer service, and they specify inspections, per the warranty and maintenance guide. They will not provide a definitive change interval. However, dealers won't tell you what that inspection entails. I'm sure they don't drain any fluid and perform an analysis. Probably just charge you $100 to check for leaks and fluid level. I'm coming up on 60K miles, but I'll wait until 100K miles to have mine replaced. It's funny, my wife's Prius has a CVT (don't know if its the same model or not) with a recommended 60K mile service. I don't understand why this is such a secret.
 
#9
remove drain plug and inner plastic spout about 2 quarts will drain out put plug and spout back in measure fluid amount buy marking container you drain it into. then fill the same container to that mark/line you made then pour it in the trans. fill plug. drive for a few miles 50 miles or so then repeat this a couple of times ! because of mileage . if had lower miles 40k or less only need to do the prosses once !
 
#10
fill the same container to that mark/line you made then pour it in the trans. fill plug. drive for a few miles 50 miles
I would strongly advise against driving 50 miles (or any distance) between fillings. You briefly shift at idle to mix new/old fluid. Never take the road before adjusting the fluid level with the car in fluid temp detection mode. CVT are simple but with tight tolerances: driving even a short distance without an adjusted fluid level might be enough to damage the unit.
 
#11
I would strongly advise against driving 50 miles (or any distance) between fillings. You briefly shift at idle to mix new/old fluid. Never take the road before adjusting the fluid level with the car in fluid temp detection mode. CVT are simple but with tight tolerances: driving even a short distance without an adjusted fluid level might be enough to damage the unit.
Fluid level accuracy is the only variable that concerns me, if I do it myself. The beaker measuring method (old vs. new) some folks use, just doesn't cut it for me. I'm sure it probably works fine. I need to physically observe evidence that the fluid level is within spec. So for me, I'll let the dealer do it. Personally, I don't want to risk a miscalculation of the fluid level and have to spend $7K+ for a replacement CVT.
 
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