CVT worries

Discussion in '2014 + Toyota Corolla' started by howlinwolf, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. howlinwolf

    howlinwolf New Member

    After reading 10 pages of this board you all have me worried about my decision to buy 2016 Corolla LE cvt. mainly the CVT part. Help me feel better again lol
     
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  3. jolly

    jolly New Member

    Well, you have read those pages. You’ve seen odd units with real problems (albeit sometimes not very well documented…) like for any mechanical device.
    You’ve also seen that’s what they are: odd cases as neither TrueDelta, Consumer Reports or JD Powers show a surge or trend in complaints.
    And those K313 Toyota-Aisin units in our Corollas have been out for almost 8 years (worldwide) now…
    In the 60 years or so CVTs have been used in cars, some – not all – iterations from various brands have been bad with clearly and soon identified engineering culprit.
    Then developing a CVTphobia is like avoiding pick-ups and SUV because there once were some GM prompt to fire or Ford prompt to blow tires.
    Now, liking or not liking the way CVT works is another story.:)
     
  4. OP
    howlinwolf

    howlinwolf New Member

    to be honest, CVT does not bother me. I have owned 2 Toyota tacomas and loved them both. I was researching a car for my 60 mile trip to work MPGs and Corollas had the MPGs I was looking for and noted to be very reliable plus affordable and that plus ive always like my Toyotas is why I decided on the Corolla. I have my V8 for fun driving. This board just got me to thinking about my decision. Thanks for your reply jolly
     
  5. I've had issues with my CVT, despite all of that, I actually like the CVT technology due to the fuel economy it gives me.

    It does make it pointless to have manual option on the S, because there are no set gears to go through, you do not get that type of feel.
     
  6. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    I'm in the same exact boat you're in. Yesterday my wife and I went to the bank to transfer the necessary funds to buy our new 2018 Corolla. By next week we'll be shopping for it. I have never driven a newer vehicle with a CVT, and I won't until I'm ready to shop for, and buy this new Toyota. At this point we are 99% sure we're going to buy a Corolla. CVT's are everywhere today. Especially in 4 cylinder compacts from all of the major manufacturers. And as was pointed out, there has not been a big surge in problems.

    They drive differently, and personally I believe that is why so many have negative comments about them. As soon as I hear people complaining about the "performance" of a 4 cylinder compact, I usually stop reading, and dismiss anything further. That's like complaining a .22 pistol doesn't have the same stopping power of a 10 MM semi auto. We're in the market for a Corolla because we want a small vehicle that looks good, and delivers nice drivability, along with good fuel economy. And Toyota has had an excellent reputation for reliability and customer satisfaction over the decades. So based on all of that, we're comfortable in giving them our hard earned money for one.
     
    klebinek likes this.
  7. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    I have lowered my Corolla to the ground, scraped on many things, did a 2500 mile road trip and drive the car hard and surprisingly the CVT is still holding up strong. The tranny pan is dented and the axles are stressed more than stock but the car hasn't left me on the side of the road the past 4 years owning it and driving it as low as it is. Currently 56k miles. I've probably been VERY lucky though.

    I've replaced the CVT fluid at 50k miles just for peace of mind.
     
    Dru likes this.
  8. klebinek

    klebinek New Member

    Brothabear, when you replaced CVT fluid, did they try to talk you out of it? (Assuming you did it at the dealership). Did you notice any improvement? How much was it and how long did it take?
     
  9. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    I did it myself. As for improvement, it feels and drives the same. The car doesn't jerk when I put it into gear and doesn't struggle to accelerate. The fluid cost me $90 from the dealership and I think it took me about an hour to do. It was the first time I ever changed a fluid on the car or any car for that matter.
     
    klebinek likes this.
  10. klebinek

    klebinek New Member

    Nice! Was there a particular write up or YouTube video you used as a reference? Please share.
     
  11. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    I watched this video (not in English) and just followed what they did. The transmission on the car they are working is setup the same way as our cars. I would get into more detail but I can't recall the socket sizes and hex sizes I used to get the job done right now.
     
  12. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    May I ask what it cost you to have the Transmission fluid changed on your CVT Corolla?
     
  13. klebinek

    klebinek New Member

    I believe Brothabear paid $90 for the oil and did it himself.
    @brothabear - I was looking for a video like this one and couldn't find anything. Although I found videos that show how to change fluid on dipstickless A/T which is pretty similar with the overflow tube to drain excess oil once engine/transmission reaches temp and expands, I was surprised no one documented one on NA market 14-18 corollas. I might be the first one :) This is so freaking easy from looking at it, take wheel off, I'm assuming you take the left wheel well plastic cover off to get to fill hole. There are few minor details I would like to know more about, but for the most part it's very doable. 08886 cvt fluid is expensive no matter how you look at it, did you need one or two bottles? Also, looks like you can get away with pouring the oil right in the fill hole as opposed to using a pump like you have to on most lexus/toyota A/T dipstick less cars. I'm so tempted to do it, 90 bucks vs 300 is a good deal for something this easy. I'm glad you decided to change the fluid. No oil is going to last 200k miles, and if it does, cvt components are most likely worn out more as opposed to cvt where oil was replaced.

    I can figure out bolt sizes etc, did you turn on vehicle at any point after fill up and cycled through D, R, N, B a couple of times? Did you run the car until it reached temperature and released some of the fluid using that overfill plug once fluid expands when warm? I appreciate the post man!
     
    billt460 likes this.
  14. Denis L'Heureux

    Denis L'Heureux New Member

    Only rev up I've ever gotten was in the snow when traction control kicks in, it seems to have issues doing two things at once...Lol But on my second corolla in 4 years, 130k miles combined and no issues with the cvt... But like anything, there's always one bad one in a batch... When I say snow in not talking a trace of snow... Lol. IMAG2158.jpg
     
  15. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    I just wondered if anyone could quote a price they paid for a CVT fluid change at a Toyota dealership?
     
  16. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    Yes, after added the fluid I cycled through the gears, let the car warm up and let any excess fluid out after the car was warm.
     
    klebinek likes this.
  17. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    I've read that one person paid about $320 in Florida for a fluid change.
     
  18. Denis L'Heureux

    Denis L'Heureux New Member

    Toyota pumps out about 9 million corollas world wide a year, with 7 models with only one of the seven without the cvt... Don't know production numbers per model but averages out to about 1.2 mil per model. So Atleast 8 million cvt models out there a year over the last 3 or 4 corolla cvt model years... I would think any issue with the cvt is very limited.... But the answer to those limited issues and the fix is limited... You would think Toyota would want those cars so they can tear them apart...
     
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  19. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    It's getting close. We should be shopping very soon. And to be honest that is the part I absolutely hate. Haggling with car salesmen. They can manage to suck 99% of the joy out of buying a new car. Think about it. There is no other durable good you can purchase where there is no established price when you walk in. The price they advertise is always false, because they've got 479 different additional charges besides tax, that they tack on to the price they advertise.

    It's was the same way when my parents bought cars in the 50's, and it's no different today. You know walking in you're going to get screwed. The only question is by how much? It really gets annoying. I hate when people falsely act like your "friend".... Until you drive off the lot after receiving the financial reaming all of them provide you with. On most every other durable good you can possibly buy, the price is set when you walk in. You know to the penny what you'll pay when you walk out. Be it a new refrigerator, lawn mower, reclining chair, gun, shovel, screwdriver, name it and the price is set before you walk in. Not new automobiles.

    And all of these dealers that advertise these so called, "No Haggle Prices" are even more full of it. Because there is no such thing when shopping for a new car. If you believe that they're screwing you even more. I just hate going through the whole process. At least we won't be trading in or financing anything. So that limits the avenues they can navigate, to achieve the reaming they so love to give every customer.
     
  20. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    While that's high, it's less than 1/10th the cost of a replacement out of warranty. So when you look at it in that regard, it's not too bad. And it's relatively cheap insurance to keep your CVT in good shape well beyond the warranty.
     
  21. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    Yeah it costs a lot since it's a full fluid drain where they drop the pan, replace the gasket and refill it completely with 2 bottles of the CVT fluid they sell ($90 each). I believe each can is 4L and the car takes 7L after being completely drained.
     
  22. billt460

    billt460 New Member

    So the fluid itself is $90.00 for a 4 Liter can?
     
  23. brothabear

    brothabear New Member

    Correct.
     
  24. SuperchargedMR2

    SuperchargedMR2 New Member

    I never go through the salesman. I build the car I want on the Toyota website and send it out to roughly 10 different dealers. These emails go to the internet manager and I do all of my negotiating on line. That's how I bought my 2017 Corolla iM for $13560 + TT&L. You have to know how to do it! NEVER go through to a dealer and work through a salesman. It will take forever and suck the life out of you. I went to the dealer to test drive the car we agreed on and if everything is good I go straight to the office to do the paperwork. I'm out in less then 30 minutes after the test drive is done.

    I've bought every new car for the past 11 years this way and it's wonderful. I get all of the dealers bidding against each other for my business. You need to learn how to do it the right way!
     
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