Regular or Premium?

#2
You should always be using regular 87 octane fuel versus 91/93 octane premium fuel in a Corolla regardless of year. There's not a single Corolla out there that requires premium unless it was done aftermarket and someone turbocharged it. You're just wasting money if you think you're getting more performance or gas mileage out of it.

Top tier gas stations I prefer Shell and Chevron above all.
 

HanSolo

New Member
#3
I stick with only top tier fuel which means Exxon/Mobil, Shell, BP, or Costco around me. While premium could be a waste of money, running 89 octane could have merits depending on your particular operating conditions along with the factory ECM calibrations. Some companies like Ford, Porsche, and others utilize a strategy that constantly looks for higher octane fuel by utilizing the knock sensors. In fact I currently run my old Focus on 89 octane because it really likes it a lot better. There is no difference at the top end, but there is noticeable increases at the low and midrange. Others simply tune their vehicles straight up for 87 octane. I bring this up because I have no clue how Toyota does things. However 89 octane could be useful if you have a fully loaded car and plan on climbing steep grades on a very hot and dry day.
 
#4
I agree with Matthew. Anything above the manufacturer's recommendation is just wasting money. The Corolla was purposefully engineered and designed to be economical to operate, so being able to run it on 87 octane was factored into the vehicle's design. While running on 89 octane or higher won't damage the car, it certainly won't have any benefits, either.

After owning a twin turbo Volvo that required premium fuel and drank it at a rate of 25mpg, filling up the Corolla with 87 octane is a pleasure and a welcome financial relief!
 
#5
I agree with Matthew. Anything above the manufacturer's recommendation is just wasting money. The Corolla was purposefully engineered and designed to be economical to operate, so being able to run it on 87 octane was factored into the vehicle's design. While running on 89 octane or higher won't damage the car, it certainly won't have any benefits, either.

After owning a twin turbo Volvo that required premium fuel and drank it at a rate of 25mpg, filling up the Corolla with 87 octane is a pleasure and a welcome financial relief!
Filling my FR-S with premium wasn't fun either and that car is naturally aspirated! It got 30 mpg driving normally though.
 

HanSolo

New Member
#6
Filling up with premium is not a burden. If you buy a performance or luxury car and whine about premium fuel, then perhaps you bought the wrong car. At Costco, premium is only 25-30 cents more. At 15 gallons, that still less that $5 which will not buy you lunch anymore. Unfortunately some stations now gouge you as some of the Shell and Exxon stations around me charge 60-100 cents more per gallon.
 
#7
Filling up with premium is not a burden. If you buy a performance or luxury car and whine about premium fuel, then perhaps you bought the wrong car. At Costco, premium is only 25-30 cents more. At 15 gallons, that still less that $5 which will not buy you lunch anymore. Unfortunately some stations now gouge you as some of the Shell and Exxon stations around me charge 60-100 cents more per gallon.
Just one of the reasons the twin turbo S-80 is no longer in my garage! It was a big expense to maintain and to drive. Lovely car, don't get me wrong; but I just couldn't afford to keep it and drive it 25,000 miles a year... I am much happier with the Corolla in terms of overall cost of ownership.
 

le+14

New Member
#8
Just curious what kind of fuel you guys use for any year Corolla you own.
I live in Los Angeles so regular from Chevron is good for me.
I live in the Dallas area and have always used just about all the major brands including Chevron. I have gone from 20 MPG city driving/30 MPG highway on the previous car to 30 MPG/40 MPG on the Corolla and with gas prices nearing the $2 mark I'm not complaining. LOL.
I have noticed that some pumps (out of state) have 85 octane so it probably is best to stick with the 87 octane selection even though it may be a few cents higher.
 

le+14

New Member
#9
Just a note to visitors to DFW airport. Gas prices on the airport are 50 cents per gallon higher than stations less than a mile away off the airport. Probably true at most airports, too.

Intended to comment on last post but it timed out. Previously car was a 2000 Mercury Sable LS Premium. Present car is a 2014 Toyota Corolla LE Plus. So far I haven't found a thing that the Corolla isn't a lot better than the Sable. I could go on and on and on with a long list, but the spouse says I never can stop finding something that I like that is a lot better on the Corolla . LOL.
 
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#11
A lot has changed in 14 years. Today's Corolla is the equivalent of a Camry from the 90's.
That's not necessarily a bad thing. Look at all the electrical issues on several vehicles. Things that look convenient and nice turn into, "Oh great, just another area for a problem."
 
#12
That is what I was trying to imply before my frustration with my damn Ipad forced me to truncate what I originally was going to type. The mid 90's Camry has a special place in the heart of many people because it was one well built car. Dimensionally, the Corolla is also provides about the same amount of interior space as the Camry from that era had. I just wish that Toyota would have emphasized NVH as well as fit and finish better as it is very lacking in the Corolla when compared to some of the really hot compacts like the Focus or Mazda 3.
 
#13
That is what I was trying to imply before my frustration with my damn Ipad forced me to truncate what I originally was going to type. The mid 90's Camry has a special place in the heart of many people because it was one well built car. Dimensionally, the Corolla is also provides about the same amount of interior space as the Camry from that era had. I just wish that Toyota would have emphasized NVH as well as fit and finish better as it is very lacking in the Corolla when compared to some of the really hot compacts like the Focus or Mazda 3.
If I could have justified the $27,500 pricetag of the 2015 Mazda 3 S Grand Touring with the tech package, I would have gotten that for sure.. Talk about an amazing car. Never thought I'd enjoy a sedan that much and the amount of room in the front is superb. Mazda is doing a fantastic job with their current lineup.

I don't regret my 2015 Corolla LE Eco Premium one bit though. To me, mine feels pretty quiet with the Michelin tires. Very comparable to the Mazda 3, but a more pillowy ride versus the sportier ride. Huge power difference too, but all I use the car is for getting to work and running errands. I plan on getting a second sports car to drive on weekends and mod out.
 
#14
This is an economy not performance car. Premium fuel will not enhance the driving dynamics or increase hp. But there's also nothing wrong with using it if that's your preferred octane.
 
#15
You should always be using regular 87 octane fuel versus 91/93 octane premium fuel in a Corolla regardless of year. There's not a single Corolla out there that requires premium unless it was done aftermarket and someone turbocharged it. You're just wasting money if you think you're getting more performance or gas mileage out of it.

Top tier gas stations I prefer Shell and Chevron above all.
i have a knocking noise coming from the engine when standing still, the noise goes away when i put the car in neutral, so i took it to the dealer and they told me that the noise is normal, and that if i want it gone i should use higher octane.
 
#16
fireblade929, sorry to hear of your trouble. That doesn't sound like pre-detonation (ping or knock) to me. A car 'knocks' under light load and it typically goes away with a rise in rpm. Your knock sounds like a mechanical, not fuel derived issue.
 
#17
Premium. Purrs like a kitten.
I know I could get by with regular but, sometimes this car will sit for a month between being driven. It has 8800 miles on it at >3 years old. I'd like to think that I'm doing it a service by using premium gas in it. And since I only need gas about once per month, it doesn't drain my wallet.
My reasoning is that all engines can benefit from a higher octane gasoline. Sure, it won't effect the mileage rating but it will effect how long an engine will run.
Gas today has an additive that leads to caramelization, I've been through this with some lawn equipment, if higher octane gas can prevent even a little bit of this I'm all for it.
There were studies done not too long ago that basically said that all gasoline have the same additives and none will give you better mileage or horsepower.
That the three grades are all a big marketing scam. If this is completely true, why do race cars use 100 octane fuel and even CAM 2?
Ok, haters welcome!
 
#18
Just curious what kind of fuel you guys use for any year Corolla you own.
I live in Los Angeles so regular from Chevron is good for me.
the only thing we can say the difference is, when using a premium or higher octane, it BURNS quicker. you know where im goin with this? corolla's computer might recompute something if you changed it to higher octane fuel. but i would use the regular or unleaded or non-premium one. why? someone said it is not a performance engine. :) waste of money. for sure if we are rich, we wont by corolla. :)

bottom line is, the engine needs to burn something.
 
#20
I don't waste my money on anything higher than regular. I "experimented" with premium and it was not worth it. In fact I think it got slightly worse mileage.
 
#22
Premium. Purrs like a kitten.
I know I could get by with regular but, sometimes this car will sit for a month between being driven. It has 8800 miles on it at >3 years old. I'd like to think that I'm doing it a service by using premium gas in it. And since I only need gas about once per month, it doesn't drain my wallet.
My reasoning is that all engines can benefit from a higher octane gasoline. Sure, it won't effect the mileage rating but it will effect how long an engine will run.
Gas today has an additive that leads to caramelization, I've been through this with some lawn equipment, if higher octane gas can prevent even a little bit of this I'm all for it.
There were studies done not too long ago that basically said that all gasoline have the same additives and none will give you better mileage or horsepower.
That the three grades are all a big marketing scam. If this is completely true, why do race cars use 100 octane fuel and even CAM 2?
Ok, haters welcome!
Not all studies are actual studies regardless of how they call them. What makes you think that study was done correctly? Can you give a link to that or is it just some hersay?
 
#23
Octane level has no effect on a car sitting for long periods. Nor does every car benefit from higher octane when made to run on 87 "or higher". Some very high compression Turbo GDi equipped vehicles are having issue maintaining spark control and knock retardation and thus may benefit. But this is an issue that requires fixing. Our Corolla is neither Turbo, GDi or even high compression. If your car runs better on high octane, something may be wrong with your car or, like we all have done at some point, you're relying on your "butt dyno." :)
 
#24
Not all studies are actual studies regardless of how they call them. What makes you think that study was done correctly? Can you give a link to that or is it just some hersay?
I'm not sure if you agree or disagree lol.
When I was researching this I found a video on YouTube by CNN, from a few years back. I took what I got from that video and posted here.
 
#25
Octane level has no effect on a car sitting for long periods. Nor does every car benefit from higher octane when made to run on 87 "or higher". Some very high compression Turbo GDi equipped vehicles are having issue maintaining spark control and knock retardation and thus may benefit. But this is an issue that requires fixing. Our Corolla is neither Turbo, GDi or even high compression. If your car runs better on high octane, something may be wrong with your car or, like we all have done at some point, you're relying on your "butt dyno." :)
I have a VERY sensitive "butt dyno"!
LMBO!
I like how you put quotations around "or higher" since that's what I remember seeing in the manual. So, no harm no foul.
If this was my daily driver, you bet I would be putting 87 in there!
Maybe I will do my own personal research on my car. I have a shop nearby that has a dyno. They charge $75 per visit, but it would fun to do!
If I ask nice they'll probably let me film it for YouTube!
"butt dyno", still LMBO!!
 
#26
Hi Froylan, I remember that the cartalk guys, "click and clack" (PBS radio show) said that premium is a waste of money. So I agree with all the other posters, there's no reason for you to use it.
 
#27
I'm not sure if you agree or disagree lol.
When I was researching this I found a video on YouTube by CNN, from a few years back. I took what I got from that video and posted here.
CNN never did a scientific study.
In fact, what they did was unscientific. They tried to put higher octane fuel into a car that never was designed for it. Then measured one sample and claimed then discovered "a scam" because there was no difference.
Controlled environment, repeatability of measurements, multiple samples? Forget all that scientific nonsense.
Just measure one time SOMETHING, and then believe it was all true...(sigh)
TLDR: That "study" was a joke.
 
#28
If you ever want to get down to a persons true nature...talk about their gas or engine oil preferences. lmao. My 2015 Kawi Ninja, big stick right on the gas tank USE PREMIUM FUEL 91 OR HIGHER...my 2014 Corolla, no such wording, verbage or recommendation anywhere that notes this. Ill run 85 and anyone else is free to run what they wish too. LOL
 
#29
If you ever want to get down to a persons true nature...talk about their gas or engine oil preferences. lmao. My 2015 Kawi Ninja, big stick right on the gas tank USE PREMIUM FUEL 91 OR HIGHER...my 2014 Corolla, no such wording, verbage or recommendation anywhere that notes this. Ill run 85 and anyone else is free to run what they wish too. LOL
Corolla's manual says that it should be 87 at least (I assume it is AKI or PON number, which is (R+M)/2).
 
#33
unleaded petrol. It's either that or diesel at my local filling station. And my toyota doesn't take diesel.
So it's a straight forward decision.
 
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